The Ebb & Flow

The Ebb & Flow: 35th Anniversary Edition



Dear Friends,

Here at the Land Trust, we are celebrating our 35th Anniversary and we cannot thank all of our loyal supporters enough. No matter how you’ve been involved in the Land Trust over the years, we could not have done it without you. We are fortunate to have worked with generous landowners, long-time donors, committed board members, community leaders, and so many more inspiring Lowcountry citizens. The Land Trust could not have made it this far without the support of our community.

We are proud of our work over the past 35 years and honored to continue the legacy of our founders and the community movement that started it all. In the mid 1980s when Bill Alge was rounding up his neighbors in an effort to protect a few acre island in their West Ashley neighborhood, he believed that’s all he was doing. He could never have predicted the neighborhood would move on to form a nonprofit and place a conservation easement on the property, protecting it in perpetuity. Thirty-five years later we are still using this essential tool to protect properties across the entirety of the Lowcountry, and Alge Island stands as a testament to the lasting impact of our work.

While we are proud of our history, we are always looking forward as an organization and we know that conservation is as important now, if not more, than it was 35 years ago. Today, we are seeing an ever-growing threat to our wild, open spaces as more people are falling in love with the places that we have cherished for generations. We are caught in the vice grip of rising tides and pressing development, but we will not back down from a challenge.

As an organization, we are committed to continuing our relationships with landowners, donors, and partners alike to preserve Lowcountry lands which connect us to our lifestyle, history, culture, and sense of place. We know that you feel as we do: if we do not protect it now, we may never get it back. We have a strong legacy of success, and a robust family of supporters to carry us forward. Here’s to the next 35 and the Soul of the Lowcountry. 

Your biggest fan,

Ashley Demosthenes
President & CEO
Lowcountry Land Trust


 

Interview: Celebrating 35 Years of Protecting the Lowcountry

For our 35th anniversary, we want to reflect upon our history and celebrate the milestones we’ve achieved while also discussing the vital future of our organization. Over the last 35 years, the Lowcountry Land Trust has worked with landowners, communities, private businesses, and local government to conserve treasured lands that are necessary for a healthy coastline environment while simultaneously protecting the culture and history of the Lowcountry.

It all started in the mid-1980s when Bill Alge saw a threat of development creeping into his West Ashley neighborhood. When he rounded up his neighbors and inspired them to save the island that rests just between their neighborhood and the water, it led to a journey he could never have predicted.


Other News

LLT Protects Land on the Black River We’re happy to announce the permanent protection of 444 acres on the Black River in Georgetown County with a conservation easement. The project was propelled by funding from the South Carolina Conservation Bank. Additional partners who provided support include Ducks Unlimited and the US Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS), via a grant through the North American Wetlands Conservation Act (NAWCA).  Read the full story here

LLT 2021 Sporting Clays Shoot – Join us for our Annual Sporting Clays Shoot at White House Plantation, a protected property in Green Pond, SC. On Saturday, November 13th, and Sunday, November 14th, guests will enjoy a professionally set clays course (courtesy of the Fourth Thursday Club) highlighting the scenic landscape of the ACE Basin and the Ashepoo River. Experienced and novice shooters are encouraged to attend one of four rotations throughout the weekend. Lunch-only tickets are available. Register or learn more here

Wild Reads – In September, Lowcountry Land Trust hosted our inaugural Wild Reads meeting. Thank you to everyone who participated as we discussed “The Flora and Fauna of Las Vegas” and how the story reflects on our own lives here in the Lowcountry. Are you interested in participating in our October meeting? Learn more here.

Drayton Hall Family Day: Bring the whole family out to Drayton Hall on Saturday, November 20th,  from 9:00 am to 2:30 pm for a fun and exciting day of interactive learning activity and bulb planting for spring blooms! Learn more or register here.






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